Returning to East Jerusalem…




 

 

April 7, 2013      East Jerusalem

Local time: 4:00 AM

The wailing chant of the muezzin woke me up.  As an outsider, this unfamiliar daily call to prayer for muslims reminds me that I am not just 7,397 miles away from my home in Napa, California; I am centuries removed from the familiar frames of reference that define my daily existence.  But there is also a familiarity to all of this for me…

I started this blog in early 2005 because of a chance encounter I had with an elderly Palestinian man in East Jerusalem on November 3, 2004.  Almost nine years later, I am back…

On the surface, East Jerusalem seems cleaner and quieter to me today than it did in 2004.  I’ve been here about 14 times since my first business trip to Israel in 2002.  This Spring the weather is dry, clear, and cool.  Walking through the Old City, things feel calm, not riddled with the tension of active conflict and imbalance that I have felt on many other visits.  I’ve been asking local friends for an update on the most pressing issues in Jerusalem and, so far, I’ve been told me that one social issue of increasing concern is the degree to which gender segregation has become more pronounced, even though the public buses are no longer segregated.  At the same time, the struggle for the recognition of reform and conservative in Israel continues unabated. Some progress has been made, but it remains painfully slow due to the entrenched political power in the Knesset of the ultra-orthodox minority.  I asked one friend what the “top of mind” political issue in Israel is likely to be in the short term this year, and she said “elimination of the exemption from military service for the ultra orthodox”.  Security and Iran were not on the top three list…

This is my first time back in Israel since December 2009.   I remember vividly my first visit to East Jerusalem in 2003, when I was introduced by Rabbi David Saperstein to Anat Hoffman of the Israel Religious Action Center and founder of Women of the Wall.  We met at the Jerusalem Hotel, and this led to a random meeting with a Palestinian man who spoke fluent Spanish outside of the Interior Ministry in East Jerusalem, an encounter that started this blog.

Much has happened in my life since then- professional successes, professional failures, the death of close friends, my own divorce.  And today I look ahead with renewed vigor as I open a new book, not just a new chapter, in both my family and professional lives: remarriage, personal renewal, new business ventures, and revitalized new and old friendships.

I feel fortunate to be back in Jerusalem this week as part of a trip with the Philanthropy Workshop West.  This extraordinary group has chosen to come to Israel this year for their international workshop for a series of meetings with thought leaders and experts on the region in order to better understand the complex social fabric that defines is at the center of the conflict that defines Israel. It is a privilege for me to join them.

 

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